What do you want to hear?

I’m a talker. I like to share what I know and ask questions about what I don’t know. I love to share things that I have made and also to share things that I find inspiring. So with that in mind- what do you want to hear?! We are looking forward to creating some cool little videos on things that we are excited about. Are you curious about a certain historical textile? Do you want to know how to do a certain technique? Are there certain yarns that you were afraid to try? Or do you just want to learn cool Continue Reading…

Italian Hemstitch

I love little tricks in weaving, especially if they help me to avoid tying knots for fringe. I don’t know, but I would much rather take the time weaving in ends and perfecting the surface of the cloth, not tying knots. The Italian Hemstitch is one of the solutions that I have learned to create a beautiful hem without worrying about the fabric unravelling and also avoiding tying knots. Here is how to do it! Before you start you want to figure out what kind of shape you would like the final “knot” to have. Each portion of the “knots” Continue Reading…

Weaver’s Knot

I just finished another warp of blankets from my loom. As I was looking to what I had left, I had quite a bit of loom waste left over. I decided it was time to try a new technique to preserve the threading of the heddles and the sleying of the reed but still wind on a new warp. I tied on the new warp to the old warp- thread by thread. This may seem crazy- but this way I can weave the full length of the older warp and not have to crouch down behind the loom to get Continue Reading…

Overshot Basics

I contracted the weaving bug when I first started looking at overshot. There is something about the idea of making circles and curves in a format of 90 degree angles that has always been intriguing to me. However, I didn’t know the slightest thing about overshot patterns when I tried them. I couldn’t figure out why I wasn’t creating roses, or stars, or anything really- just weird floats with no pattern structure at all. The above pattern has been on my “to weave list” since I could comfortably warp a loom by myself. Now that I have designed a little Continue Reading…

Not Enough Treadles for the Tie-Up

Recently, I received an email with a question about reading tie-ups, specifically referencing a page in the The Handweaver’s Pattern Directory  by Anne Dixon. If you look to pages 38 and 39 of this book (and elsewhere, this is just specifically mentioned in my email) the threading of the pattern looks simple enough. With most four harness patterns there are six treadles that are used. Two for the tabby and four for the twill patterning. In these drafts however there are 12-14 treadles being used. I also had that same surge of panic when I looked at those black blocks in Continue Reading…

Photographing Your Hand Weaving

I love looking at photographs of textiles- especially when the colors are rich and saturated. When I can see the individual stitches or picks of the cloth I tend to fall into the imagery. The age of digital cameras and inexpensive photo editing software makes it incredibly easy to share your own work with the rest of the world. Even if you are not confident with a camera, here are a few tips to help take baby steps in creating beautiful photographs of your weavings! Photograph your work against a neutral, non-competing background This is not a good photograph. Why? Continue Reading…

How to Plan a Project: Calculating Weft

  Have you ever planned your weaving project- full of excitement to weave it off the loom? You get rolling, winding bobbins and just full of anticipation to see your finished creation? Then, about ¾ of the way through the project, you go to wind another bobbin and you can’t find your weft yarn. Why can’t you find it? Because you have used it all up because you didn’t account for the amount of weft you would need. So when you order more yarn or go to your local yarn shop, you can’t find the same dye lot, and you Continue Reading…

How to Plan a Project: Calculating Warp

So you have finally found a weaving draft that you love. You can see it in your house are wrapped around your neck and you are so excited to get started working on it! But how much warp do you need? How much yarn do you need order in order to make the warp and have enough for weft? How do you figure out the sett? There are so many things to think about and it can be very frustrating. Here is part one in planning your project; figuring out your warp needs. Your warp is the foundation to your Continue Reading…

Reading a Draft Part Two: There isn’t a draw down!

You have been finding cool weaving drafts all over the place, you are getting excited that you are starting to be able to understand what you are reading. You skip over to a library you know has books of weaving drafts and you try to explore some historical weaves. You open up a book and suddenly there are no pictures! All there is are grids and notes and nothing to indicate what you are looking at. Don’t be devastated! It takes a little bit more work, but you can create your own draw down from information that is given. A prime Continue Reading…

How to Read a Weaving Draft

Last week I explained all the different terms that are used in weaving drafts. Today I will show you how all the fancy words come together so you can read and translate a standard weaving draft. Disclaimer: A standard reading draft to me is translated for a jack-type loom where the shed is created by lifting the harnesses. The Draft A color and weave pattern means that a pattern is created by the intersection of the stripes of different colors. And they are defined by the type of weave structure used to create it. This is a balanced twill with 6 thread stripes Continue Reading…