Chunky Yarn Obsession

Back in 2015, I did a yarn review on the Rios line of yarn for Malabrigo, you can check out the video here. What I did not mention is that Malabrigo has an incredible selection of all different sizes and colors. I became mildly obsessed with their Rasta yarn. The description from the Malabrigo website describes the yarn as “a lightly-fulled single-ply yarn of magnum proportions!” And they were not kidding. This yarn is crazy squishy, beautiful, and very bold. I decided that it would best be used in some chunky throws. I was only going to do a few, Continue Reading…

Malabrigo Rios Yarn Review

I wove a winter kerchief for my husband. Together we looked at many different types of yarns and patterns and finally decided on using Malabrigo Rios a superwash merino yarn. This Malabrigo yarn was so neat to work with that we decided to make a little video to share our excitement about this new yarn we found. Let us know what you think of the video and if you want to see more videos like this.   Photo Gallery Here are a few photos of how my husband plans to wear his kerchief while snowboarding. Video Transcript Hello! Hello! In Continue Reading…

Rhinebeck 2015

This is the fourth year that I have attended the New York State Sheep and Wool Festival in Rhinebeck, New York. I used to scour fiber festivals for that perfect fleece for felting, or those new knitting yarns- but now I go to see what colors are trending, what people are knitting and creating, and also what finished goods are selling. This year I took note of a couple things: I met Syne Mitchell. For those who don’t know, she is the woman who created WeaveCast- the best weaving podcast that I have heard in a long time (possibly the Continue Reading…

Rhinebeck Sheep and Wool Festival

This past weekend I attended the Rhinebeck Sheep and Wool Festival (also known as the New York State Sheep and Wool Festival) To put it simply: It was a mad and crazy knitter’s paradise. There were quite a few felting and weaving booths at the fair, but not nearly as many as the countless knitting yarn and knitted goods booths. I still knit, just not nearly as often or as complicated as I used to. This is partially due to the fact that I find weaving to be a faster process that I can understand, and partially due to my Continue Reading…

New England Weavers Seminar 2013

This past weekend I went to Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts to attend the biennial conference “New England Weavers Seminar”. The conference included a series of lectures, hands on classes, and other educational opportunities such as Juried Shows, Guild Exhibitions and guided tours. Since this was my first time attending and I do not have a loom that is easily transportable, I decided to take a series of lecture classes. This year the theme was “Weavers Together: Never Ending Weaving Stories” which brought together historical, cultural and technological influences that showed in many of the weaver’s work. The lectures and Continue Reading…

1000 Artisan Textiles: Contemporary Fiber Art, Quilts, and Wearables

I have a weak spot for books that have beautiful images of textile art and techniques. I saw this at the 2010 Rhinebeck Sheep and Wool Festival and I HAD to have it. Then soon afterwards, I received a second copy of it in the mail from my Dad as a birthday present. So I have two glorious copies, one that I can photocopy and scan for mood boards, and the other with a perfectly intact binding that I can showcase. This book was written and compiled by two sisters who wanted to showcase the wonderful talents of textile artisans Continue Reading…

Cut My Cote

Deep down in the very pit of my soul- I want to design and sew garments using my handwoven fabric. Being a fashion designer is something that I have wanted to do since I was 16 years old. However, I can’t sew. Sure I can follow a pattern pretty closely, but the garments I make never quite seem to be perfect. It is just a hurdle that I will eventually get over. What revived my drive to make garments from my handwoven cloth came my last semester of my undergraduate program. It was a late night in the weaving studio Continue Reading…

Review: Learning to Weave

Every weaver has their favorite set of books that they always have at the stand by to help answer questions or to just spark their imagination. One of the books that I learned to weave from is Learning to Weave by Deborah Chandler. Tonight I’m going to share with you why I love it so much. Learning to Weave by Deborah Chandler Interweave Press, 1995. When I first started weaving, or even getting interested in fiber design, my mother gave me this book. I really didn’t sit down and read it until a couple years ago because I was weaving, but Continue Reading…

Review: Warp & Weft

BOOK INFORMATION: Title: Warp & Weft: Woven Textiles in Fashion, Art and Interiors Author: Jessica Hemmings Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing, 2012 SYNOPSIS: This book is a written catalogue of contemporary artists and designers who use weaving as their primary medium of expression. The author surveys different aspects of art in which weaving permeates: thread, light, motion, sound, emotion and community (these categories are also the corresponding chapters in the book.) The artist’s profiled in this book use new technologies with traditional techniques to create beautiful woven creations that can be useful or thought provoking. PROS: The profiles for each artist and the specific work Continue Reading…

Review: Color and Texture in Weaving

BOOK INFORMATION: Title: Color and Texture in Weaving: 150 Contemporary Designs Author: Margo Selby Publisher: Interweave Press, 2011. SYNOPSIS: This is a weaving book that is geared towards inspiration. There isn’t necessarily projects spelt out, but there are suggestions for what the textiles could be used for. This book is definitely geared towards those who want to take their ideas and woven works to a new level. PROS: Weaving is such a visual and tactile medium and this book is really based on the visual stimulation. The images are bright and colors and there is very little text to break Continue Reading…